Authentic Thai Satay Sauce Recipe from Scratch. Best recipes with nuts. Copyright © 2022 Terence Carter / Grantourismo. All Rights Reserved.

Best Recipes with Nuts for Salads, Sauces, Sides, Noodles, Stir Fries and Curries

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Our best recipes with nuts include recipes for sauces, snacks, salads, sides, noodles, stir-fries, braises, curries, and more. We’ve got recipes for Southeast Asian style roasted peanuts to nibble on, peanut sauces to douse on salads, skewers and noodles, and Middle Eastern breakfasts, salads and sides sprinkled with pistachios, cashews and almonds.

This collection of our best recipes with nuts features dishes from right around the world – from savoury vegetable sides from the Middle East to spicy salads from Southeast Asia, from a recipe for Moroccan lamb tagine with prunes and almonds to a Vietnamese clay pot caramelised fish recipe with turmeric, dill and peanuts.

Nuts have been used in cooking forever for their health properties, as much as for flavour and texture. In fact, one of the easiest ways to add crunch to a dish is to pan-roast some nuts in a small non-stick pan, crush them up in a mortar and pestle, and sprinkle them over the dish.

But before I tell you all about our best recipes with nuts, I have a favour to ask. Grantourismo is reader-funded. If you’ve cooked our recipes and enjoyed them, please consider supporting Grantourismo. For instance, you could make a small donation to our epic Cambodian cuisine history and cookbook on Patreon, for as little as the price of a coffee. Another option is to use our affiliate partner links, below. We may earn a commission but you won’t pay extra.

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Lastly, you could buy a handcrafted KROK, the best mortar and pestle ever (we earn a small commission from your purchase); buy something on Amazon, such as these cookbooks for culinary travellers, James Beard award-winning cookbooks, cookbooks by Australian chefs, classic cookbooks for serious cooks, and gifts for Asian food lovers and picnic lovers; or browse our Grantourismo store for gifts for food lovers designed with Terence’s images. Now let me tell you all about our best recipes with nuts.

Best Recipes with Nuts for Sauces, Salads, Sides, Noodles, Stir Fries and Curries

Our best recipes with nuts include everything from sauces and salads to stir fries and curries.

Authentic Thai Satay Sauce Recipe from Scratch for Your Thai Satay Chicken Skewers

Topping this collection of our best recipes with nuts is this authentic Thai satay sauce recipe, which  makes a genuine Thai peanut satay sauce from scratch to go with Thai satay skewers. This isn’t an easy satay sauce recipe made with peanut butter (we have one of those below) although I do take a few shortcuts.

This is a traditional Thai peanut sauce recipe. If you’re planning on making the Thai chicken satay skewers recipe for sate gai, which will make you Thai satay chicken in the Southern Thailand style that you’ll find at street food stalls all over Thailand, then you need this recipe for the Thai satay sauce to serve with it.

There are so many easy peanut butter satay sauce recipes out there (including my own) that I wanted to share the authentic Thai satay sauce recipe we make, which is a slightly tweaked recipe from chef David Thompson’s Thai Street Food cookbook, for those of you who want to try making a genuine Thai peanut sauce from scratch.

Authentic Thai Satay Sauce Recipe from Scratch for Your Thai Satay Chicken Skewers

Cambodian Spicy Roasted Peanuts Recipe with Chilli, Kaffir Lime Leaves and Lemongrass

When you go out to a good bar in Cambodia, especially in Siem Reap, you’ll probably be served two or three small dishes of nibbles with your drinks – typically, crispy purple taro and orange sweet potato chips, maybe crunchy banana chips, and if you’re lucky, you’ll also get a bowl of these Cambodian spicy roasted peanuts with chillies, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, and garlic.

These deliciously-addictive roasted peanuts are aromatic, spicy, salty, and sweet. Cambodia in a nutshell, so to speak. Lara had been begging me to make these at home for years, so when I finally got around to it, we sampled a handful of packets of the Cambodian spicy roasted peanuts sold at Siem Reap’s local markets.

The peanuts at these stalls are made with way too much garlic for our liking, plus they contain long dry pieces of lemongrass, which are sharp enough to be a choking hazard. In some cases, the ratio of peanuts to the dustheap of detritus from the garlic and lemongrass made it almost impossible to selectively eat more than one peanut at a time. To attempt more would be to tempt fate. Let us know what you think of our peanuts.

Cambodian Spicy Roasted Peanuts Recipe with Chilli, Kaffir Lime Leaves and Lemongrass

 

Natang Recipe for a Cambodian Pork Coconut and Peanut Dip with Crispy Rice Cakes

This Cambodian natang recipe makes an addictively delicious dip of minced pork, coconut cream, red chillies, cloves, shallots, palm sugar, fish sauce, and roasted peanuts that’s made to be eaten with homemade crispy rice cakes, rice crackers or warm French baguettes cut into slices to dip into it.

The natang is traditionally served in a bowl, which the rice cakes or baguette slices are arranged around. In Cambodian restaurants and homes, the natang and rice crackers or baguette slices are served as an appetiser or form part of a Cambodian family meal amongst a spread of dishes.

We reduce the natang right down so we can serve it bite-size as finger food, generally among an array of Cambodian hors d’oeuvres or canapés. Natang is nearly always garnished with fresh coriander but we also add finely chopped kaffir lime.

We’d eaten natang out a lot here at restaurants in Siem Reap before trying it at home, but I remember when Terence first made natang in our Siem Reap kitchen, I could not stopped eating it. It’s incredibly moreish and after prahok k’tis, is one of my favourite Cambodian dips and one of our best recipes with nuts.

Natang Recipe for a Cambodian Pork Coconut and Peanut Dip with Crispy Rice Cakes

 

Thai Khao Tang Na Tang on Rice Cakes for a Chilli Prawn and Pork Dip Recipe

This recipe for Thai khao tang na tang on rice cakes makes a chilli prawn and pork dip that’s incredibly delicious. The popular Thai dish consists of homemade crispy rice crackers that are used to scoop up this creamy, slightly sweet, a little salty, and gently-spiced dip.

Found in both Thailand and Cambodia (see above), due to their shared histories and centuries of travel of dishes and ingredients between the two countries, many believe this snack was created to use up leftover rice, which was made into rice cakes.

In both countries, it’s been served as much as a refined appetiser by royals and elites, as it has been a casual comforting snack eaten in everyday homes. In his Thai Food cookbook, Thai chef David Thompson, in the intro to his recipe notes that rice cakes were distributed to soldiers as rations and he calls his khao tang na tang a ‘sauce’ rather than a dip. Either way, it’s delish.

Thai Khao Tang Na Tang on Rice Cakes for a Chilli Prawn and Pork Dip Recipe

 

Thai Miang Kham Recipe for Bite Sized Wraps That Are Thailand in a Mouthful

This Thai miang kham recipe makes the bite-sized wraps that are Thailand in a mouthful, an explosion of quintessential Southeast Asian flavours – sour lime, zingy ginger, crunchy peanuts, crispy shallots, smoky roasted coconut, savoury dried prawns, a kick of chilli, and a sweet yet funky caramelised sauce – wrapped in a wild piper or wild betel leaf.

Another one of our best recipes with nuts, this easy Thai miang kham recipe will make you the kind of miang kham that you can buy from a vendor at a local market – miang kham is a street food snack after all – pre-packaged from a gourmet supermarket or as an appetiser at a casual Thai restaurant or upmarket café in Thailand’s capital.

It won’t make you the posh takes on miang kham topped with sweet lobster or plump prawns, salmon roe that bursts in your mouth, or even velvety foie gras, which you’ll find at fancy fine dining restaurants in Bangkok. Although of course you can always elevate your miang kham with luxurious ingredients.

Thai Miang Kham Recipe for Bite Sized Wraps That Are Thailand in a Mouthful

 

Traditional Roasted Spicy Peanuts Recipe for the Popular Hanoi Drinking Snack

My traditional roasted spicy peanuts recipe will make you the addictive spiced nuts that are usually offered as a drinking snack during a bia hoi session in Hanoi. In some bia hoi joints – pubs that serve Hanoi’s famous fresh beer – peanuts in shells are served as a complimentary snack and these spiced nuts are sold separately.

I’ve been obsessed with making my own variations of these Vietnamese traditional roasted spicy peanuts at home here in Cambodia’s Siem Reap. When we were living on Food Street in Hanoi, during a very cold winter, the aromas of the peanuts being slowly roasted that emanated from nearby shophouses were irresistible.

Traditional Roasted Spicy Peanuts Recipe – An Addictive Southeast Asian Snack

 

Crispy Pita with Spiced Chickpeas and Yoghurt Sauce for Middle Eastern Fatteh

This recipe for crispy pita with spiced chickpeas and yogurt sauce makes fatteh, a shared Middle Eastern breakfast dish comprised mainly of leftovers, and it’s one of our best recipes with nuts. Stale pita bread is toasted to create crispy pita chips. Warm cumin-spiced chickpeas are spooned over the pita crisps, a lemony-garlic yogurt sauce drizzled over the chickpeas, and pan-roasted nuts sprinkled on top.

One of my favourite Middle Eastern recipes, this fatteh recipe will make you a rustic home-style breakfast dish of crispy pita with spiced chickpeas and yogurt sauce that’s sprinkled with pan-roasted nuts such as cashews, pistachios and pine nuts, and fresh fragrant herbs such as parsley and mint.

This recipe is based on a Syrian fatteh we ate many years ago – I’ll also be sharing another Syrian breakfast dish of ful from Aleppo – although it must be said that there are different types of fatteh right across the Middle East that differ from country to country, town to town, village to village, and home to home.

Crispy Pita with Spiced Chickpeas and Yoghurt Sauce for Middle Eastern Fatteh

 

Shan Vermicelli Salad Recipe with Coriander, Sesame and Peanuts from Shan State

This Shan vermicelli salad recipe with sesame, coriander and peanuts makes a deliciously light vegetarian noodle salad from Shan State in northeastern Myanmar, but you’ll spot variations of this dry noodle dish in markets and on menus around the country.

The recipe makes one of countless delicious salads and dry noodle dishes that distinguish the food of Shan State and Myanmar more generally. The many cuisines of Myanmar – Shan cuisine, Burmese cuisine, Rakhine cuisine, Kachin cuisine, Karen cuisine, and so on – boast an infinite array of salads, which are healthy, refreshing and light yet filling.

The salad is one of our favourite dishes from Myanmar and while it could be enjoyed as a satisfying single-bowl meal, it’s typically eaten as a contrasting accompaniment to rich oily curries, such as this Burmese Indian-style chicken curry, but would also work well with Burmese street food-style fried chicken.

If you’re cooking up a feast, you’ll also want to make some Burmese coconut rice and another salad or two, such as this Burmese raw cabbage salad and Shan tomato salad.

Shan Vermicelli Salad Recipe with Coriander, Sesame and Peanuts from Shan State

 

Beet Arugula Salad Recipe with Walnuts and Feta on Butter Bean Purée

My beet arugula salad recipe with walnuts and feta on butter bean purée will make you a twist on the classic salad of beetroot, feta and arugula – or rucola, roca or rocket depending on where you’re from – and it’s another of our best recipes with nuts. I arrange the salad on a layer of garlicky butter bean purée for added texture, and dress the salad with a mustardy vinaigrette.

This recipe is what I like to think of as an elevated version of that traditional beetroot, arugula, feta, and walnut salad, which originated in the Mediterranean, and I haven’t strayed too far from that. All I’ve done is assemble the salad on a layer of garlicky butter bean purée and generously dress the salad with our favourite mustardy vinaigrette.

Adding that additional creamy layer makes this so much more than just a side salad, it’s a course on its own. You could still serve it as a side, of course, and I’m also happy tucking into it as an appetiser. But Terence and I are very satisfied sharing a plate of this for lunch.

You can also scoop it up with large croutons or crostini or pile it on as you would a topping for bruschetta or Basque style pintxos. Or simply serve it as a salad starter or a side salad for main dishes. It’s fantastic served alongside kofta kebabs and baharat spiced meatballs. Add dishes of hummus, baba ganoush, fatoush, tabbouleh and you have a full Middle Eastern style feast.

Beet Arugula Salad Recipe with Walnuts and Feta on Butter Bean Purée

 

Spicy Peanut Butter Noodles Recipe for a Quick, Easy and Tasty Bowl of Noodles

This spicy peanut butter noodles recipe makes a quick and easy bowl of noodles that are perfect for a fast lunch or mid-week dinner, and it’s easily another of our best recipes with nuts. If you’re in the mood for satay but don’t have time to pound pastes and grind peanuts, this spicy peanut butter sauce should satisfy your cravings.

If you’re a lover of noodle dishes, you should enjoy these spicy peanut butter noodles, drizzled with chilli oil, sprinkled with crunchy roasted peanuts and crispy fried garlic, and garnished with red chillies and fragrant fresh coriander. It’s inspired by China’s famous Shaxian and Fuzhou peanut butter sauce noodles, usually garnished with scallions, sesame seeds, and chilli oil.

Make the peanut butter sauce in a wok – I use a round flat bottomed wok for this dish – as you’re going to toss the noodles into the wok when they’re done. Take care not to let the shallots or garlic burn when you’re frying them. They’ll cook very quickly.

Spicy Peanut Butter Noodles Recipe for a Quick, Easy and Tasty Bowl of Noodles

 

Chicken Salad Recipe with Peanut Sauce, Sesame, Peanuts and Coriander

One of our best recipes with nuts, this quick and easy chicken salad recipe with peanut sauce, sesame, coriander and chillies will make you a deliciously light chicken salad made with shredded poached chicken breast, drizzled with homemade peanut sauce, sprinkled with peanuts and sesame seeds, and garnished with fresh coriander sprigs and optional slices of red chillies.

While the salad comes together quickly, make the peanut sauce and poach the chicken breasts ahead of time and you can get this salad on a plate in ten minutes. Poached chicken breasts last a few days in the fridge. A jar of peanut sauce will last even longer in the fridge in a mason jar or clip-top Kilner jar and can be used not only on chicken salads, but can be drizzled over noodles and rice bowls.

When it comes to fish sauce, we recommend Thailand’s Megachef, as its sodium levels are always consistent. You could also try the Vietnamese-American brand Red Boat Fish Sauce, which our American readers often recommend, although we haven’t tried it as it’s not available here in Southeast Asia.

Chicken Salad Recipe with Peanut Sauce, Sesame, Peanuts and Coriander

 

Vietnamese Chicken Salad Recipe with Cabbage, Crunchy Peanuts and Crispy Fried Shallots

This Vietnamese chicken salad recipe makes a fantastic year-round salad called gỏi gà bắp cải in Vietnamese, which literally means salad (gỏi) of chicken (gà) and cabbage (bắp cải).

The healthy Vietnamese shredded chicken salad has heaps of texture thanks to shredded cabbage and carrot, crispy fried onions, and crunchy peanuts, making another of our best nut recipes. It’s also loaded with umami with a lively dressing of Vietnamese fish sauce, lime juice, sugar, garlic, and chilli.

The salad has lots of texture courtesy of those crunchy peanuts, as well as the crispy fried shallots and shredded cabbage, in the way that the best Southeast Asian salads do. Som tam is another great example of those textured Asian salads. Like som tam, it’s fantastic with grilled pork and fried chicken.

Vietnamese Chicken Salad Recipe with Cabbage, Crunchy Peanuts, Crispy Fried Shallots

 

Chicken Noodle Salad Recipe with Sesame Dressing, Pan Roasted Peanuts and Coriander

This chicken noodle salad recipe with sesame dressing, pan-roasted peanuts and fresh fragrant coriander makes a cold noodle salad that’s made with buckwheat noodles and shredded poached chicken, doused in a sesame dressing, and textured with crunchy pan-roasted peanuts, sesame seeds and fresh fragrant coriander.

It was one of the most popular salads of the northern hemisphere summer on our site, although is a versatile year-round dish. You can present it chilled, which you’ll want to do on a hot day, but you can also serve it up as a warm salad, which essentially turns it into a noodle dish, when it will call for a runny soft-boiled egg or two.

It’s super easy to make, coming together in half an hour, which will see it getting filed in this collection of noodle recipes made in 30 minutes or less, as well as this compilation of our best poached chicken breast recipes.

Chicken Noodle Salad Recipe with Sesame Dressing, Pan Roasted Peanuts and Coriander

 

Roast Beetroot Salad Recipe with Feta, Rucola and Pistachios on Cumin Spiced Carrot Hummus

This roast beetroot salad recipe with feta, rucola and pistachios on cumin-spiced carrot hummus makes my twist on a classic salad that takes inspiration from the Middle East, and it’s another of our best recipes with nuts. The bed of carrot hummus adds another dimension of flavour and texture, while pistachios add crunch and are better suited to this version than walnuts.

The salad is one of our best recipes with nuts and another one of our best beetroot recipes. I spread the salad on a layer of carrot hummus and replace the walnuts with crunchier pistachios for added flavour and texture.

I should mention that while my recipe only calls for ground cumin, sometimes I’ll add some chilli flakes, which give the dip warmth. Ground Aleppo pepper would also be great. Or a little ground paprika. I sprinkle black and white sesame seeds on the dip. You could do that here too.

Roast Beetroot Salad Recipe with Feta, Rucola and Pistachios on Cumin Spiced Carrot Hummus

 

Blistered Green Beans Recipe with Toasted Almonds on Garlic White Bean Purée

This blistered green beans recipe with toasted almonds makes a delicious vegetable side dish of fast wok-fried green beans that are only lightly blistered so that they’re still vibrant green and tender but firm. Stir-fried with toasted almonds for a little crunch, the green beans are piled onto a creamy garlic white bean purée for more texture.

Our simple and fast blistered green beans recipe with toasted almonds will make you a wonderful side dish that’s a perfect accompaniment to roasts and braises, such as our super easy braised lemon-garlic chicken recipe, Spanish style braised chicken with olives and capers, and Italian roast chicken recipe with peppers and leeks.

Our lightly blistered green beans recipe with toasted almonds are also perfect with pan-roasted brined pork chops, côte de bœuf or chicken cacciatore. If you’re feeding a crowd, add another two or three vegetable side dishes, such as crunchy Hassleback potatoes or creamy mashed potatoes, Italian green beans with a pangrattato of crunchy breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese, or roasted broccoli, zucchini and green beans with sesame seeds.

Blistered Green Beans Recipe with Toasted Almonds on Garlic White Bean Purée

 

Grilled Baby Corn Recipe with Creamy Butter Beans, Caramelised Shallots and Crispy Pistachios

My recipe for grilled baby corn with creamy butter beans, caramelised shallots and crispy pistachios is inspired by those deliciously addictive dishes from the Middle East that marry different textures and flavours, such as our warm chickpea salad. It makes a fantastic snack or starter or vegetable side dish to a meaty main such as an Arabic mixed grill, and it’s another of our best recipes with nuts.

You’re going to adore this recipe if you’ve made and loved our recipe for cauliflower florets oven-roasted in spiced olive oil, piled onto creamy hummus and topped with crunchy fried chickpeas, zingy pickled shallots, and fresh mint leaves. They’re practically siblings.

And if you haven’t made our hummus balila recipe for a warm chickpea salad with a crunchy Arabic salad spread on top, or our Antalya piyaz, a white bean salad of creamy soupy white beans topped with a Turkish salad and soft jammy eggs, then try those, too.

Grilled Baby Corn Recipe with Creamy Butter Beans, Caramelised Shallots and Crispy Pistachios

 

Stir-Fried Chicken with Cashews Recipe for Cambodia’s Cashew Chicken

This stir-fried chicken with cashews recipe for the Cambodian dish cha moan krop svay chanti has its origins in China, in a dish that is a fusion between a Sichuanese dish and a Cantonese specialty. Found elsewhere in Southeast Asia, including Thailand, it’s also similar to a dish known as ‘cashew chicken’ in the USA and Australia and it’s incredibly delicious.

This dish of Cambodian-Chinese provenance is a relative of the Sichuanese favourite kung pao chicken, however, that’s really another dish altogether, with its fiery chillis and numbing Sichuan peppercorns. Growing up in Australia, we have memories of a similar dish to this that we ate with our families at suburban Cantonese restaurants that was a tad milder and a little sweeter.

So what’s the difference between this Cambodian stir-fried chicken with cashews recipe and the Cantonese and Thai chicken cashew recipes? For starters, the Chinese and Thai versions use light and dark soy sauces and cornstarch to coat the chicken meat, whereas in Cambodia the chicken is marinated in fish sauce and sugar. It’s sublime.

Stir-Fried Chicken with Cashews Recipe for Cambodia’s Cashew Chicken

 

Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Prunes and Almonds Recipe from Marrakech

This Moroccan lamb tagine with prunes and almonds recipe comes to you direct from our Marrakech riad kitchen in Morocco. A Moroccan tagine is a slow-cooked stew made from meat, generally lamb or chicken, but can contain anything from duck to fish. It’s quintessential Moroccan comfort food and it’s another of our best recipes with nuts.

We learnt to make this traditional Moroccan lamb tagine with prunes and almonds recipe from Jamila, the lovely Moroccan cook in the kitchen at the Marrakech riad we settled into for two weeks way back in 2010. It’s been one of our most popular recipes since we published it that year and one of our favourite tagine recipes, along with this classic chicken tagine with preserved lemons and olives.

Traditionally, this Moroccan lamb tagine with prunes and almonds recipe would usually call for the tagine to be cooked in a tagine pot, a glazed clay base with a large conical lid that’s designed to guide the condensation from cooking back into the pot. However, as Jamila told us, these days Moroccan cooks will often cook tagines in a big cooking pot with lid on the stove and then transfer the dish to a tagine pot to serve at the centre of the table. It’s a dish to be shared.

Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Prunes and Almonds Recipe from Marrakech

 

Saraman Curry Recipe for Cambodia’s Richest Curry

Cambodia’s Saraman curry or cari Saramann is the richest of the Cambodian curries and the most complex. A cousin of the Thai Massaman curry and beef Rendang of Malaysia, its time-consuming nature makes it a special occasion dish for Cambodians, particularly in the Cham Muslim communities of Cambodia.

The similarity between Cambodia‘s Saraman curry and Thailand’s Massaman curry lies in the base curry paste with just a few ingredients setting the Saraman curry apart and that’s the use of star anise, sometimes turmeric, dry roasted grated coconut, and peanuts.

The dry roasted grated coconut is what the Saraman curry has in common with Malaysia’s beef Rendang, helping to give the curry that beautiful rich, thick gravy that has you adding yet another spoonful of rice to your bowl just to mix it with the sauce.

Cambodia’s Rich and Spicy Saraman Curry Recipe – How to Make Cambodian Cari Saramann

 

Braised Pork Belly Recipe with Ginger, Black Pepper, Palm Sugar, Star Anise and Peanuts

This braised pork belly recipe with ginger, black pepper, palm sugar, star anise, and peanuts makes a comforting melt-in-in-your-mouth slow-cooked pork belly dish that locals here in Cambodia simply call a pork stew or khor sach chrouk – also spelt kaw sach chrouk.

‘Stew’ in Khmer is ‘khor’ or ‘kaw’ and ‘sach chrouk’ means pork meat. A literal translation might be khor sach chrouk knhei mrech skor thnot sondek dei, which explains why it’s just called a Cambodian pork stew.

Whatever you want to call this braised pork recipe, it makes an incredibly delicious dish. The palm sugar caramelises the pork and combined with ginger gives the dish a sweet fragrance, while the peanuts add crunch, making it another of our best recipes with nuts. It’s not only one of our favourite pork belly recipes, it’s one of our favourite pork recipes.

Braised Pork Belly Recipe with Ginger, Black Pepper, Palm Sugar, Star Anise and Peanuts

 

Authentic Beef Massaman Curry Recipe for a Rich Complex Southern Thailand Curry

An authentic beef Massaman curry from Southern Thailand is one of our most favourite kinds of Thai curries – years before we went to Thailand for holidays and moved to Bangkok, we’d been dreaming of eating this complex curry in its place of origin.

It’s the richness and earthiness of the Thai beef Massaman curry that makes this the most more-ish of all Thai curries. While the prep list is long and the cooking time requires the patience of a saint, Terence thinks it’s by far the most rewarding Thai curry to make.

There are three separate stages for this Massaman curry recipe and the recipe is broken down into those sections, although you can make the beef Massaman curry paste in advance, to save time on the day.

This Thai Massaman curry recipe is not only one of our best curry recipes, garnished with fresh coriander sprigs and sprinkled with pan-roasted peanuts, it’s another of our best recipes with nuts.

Authentic Beef Massaman Curry Recipe for a Rich Complex Southern Thailand Curry

 

Massaman Curry Fried Rice Recipe for Fried Rice with Crispy Onions, Crunchy Potatoes and Pan-Roasted Peanuts

This Massaman curry fried rice recipe makes a fantastic, filling, fragrant fried rice with crispy onions, crunchy fried potatoes, pan-roasted peanuts, and the perfume of dried spices. I created this Massaman curry fried rice to use up leftover Massaman chicken curry, but you could also make it from scratch. Garnish with fresh coriander to lighten things up.

Savoury rice with crunchy fried potatoes, crispy fried onions, pan-roasted peanuts, and the perfume of dried spices such as cumin, cardamom, cinnamon, and nutmeg, my Massaman curry fried rice recipe makes the perfect bowl of comfort food. Full of flavour, filling, and energy-giving – with rice and potatoes, it’s loaded with carbs – it would also fix a hangover or be perfect for fuelling up before exercise.

I created this Massaman curry fried rice recipe to use up leftover steamed rice and Thai Massaman curry leftovers we had in the fridge from the previous night. There are few things I hate more than food wastage than throwing out perfectly good leftover food when there are so many hungry people in the world. Fried rice is not only a fantastic solution for leftover rice, but also for leftover curries and stir-fry leftovers.

Massaman Curry Fried Rice Recipe for Fried Rice with Crispy Onions, Crunchy Potatoes and Pan-Roasted Peanuts

 

Easy Vietnamese Clay Pot Caramelised Fish Recipe with Fresh Turmeric, Fragrant Dill and Peanuts

This easy Vietnamese caramelised fish recipe with fresh turmeric, fragrant dill and peanuts comes together quickly and it’s another of our best recipes with nuts. Called ‘Vietnamese clay pot fish with fresh dill’ at Hoi An’s Red Bridge Cooking School where we first learnt to make it, the dish is a combination of two Vietnamese specialties, chả cá lã vọng from the North and cá kho tộ from the South.

Our delicious Vietnamese caramelised fish recipe with fresh turmeric and fragrant dill is adapted from a recipe for Vietnamese clay pot fish with fresh dill that we learnt to cook at the Red Bridge Cooking School when we lived in Hoi An in Central Vietnam back in 2013.

I’ve given this caramelised fish recipe a few small tweaks but it’s still essentially the same dish. We make it with salmon, because I absolutely adore it, and we use salmon pieces rather than fillets as they work better if you’re planning to serve this with rice or noodles.

You can buy palm sugar online, or use coconut sugar, or brown, raw or white sugar. Do as the locals do and serve with either steamed rice or rice noodles. If you’re outside Vietnam or Southeast Asia and can’t get fresh rice noodles, use dried vermicelli.

Easy Vietnamese Clay Pot Caramelised Fish Recipe with Fresh Turmeric, Fragrant Dill and Peanuts

 

Please do let us know if you many any of our best recipes with nuts as we love to hear how our recipes turn out for our readers.

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A travel and food writer who has experienced over 70 countries and written for The Guardian, Australian Gourmet Traveller, Feast, Delicious, National Geographic Traveller, Conde Nast Traveller, Travel+Leisure Southeast Asia, DestinAsian, TIME, CNN, The Independent, The Telegraph, Sunday Times Travel Magazine, AFAR, Wanderlust, International Traveller, Get Lost, Four Seasons Magazine, Fah Thai, Sawasdee, and more, as well as authored more than 40 guidebooks for Lonely Planet, DK, Footprint, Rough Guides, Fodors, Thomas Cook, and AA Guides.

2 thoughts on “Best Recipes with Nuts for Salads, Sauces, Sides, Noodles, Stir Fries and Curries”

  1. Hi Rita, if you don’t already use dukkah / duqqa – an Egyptian/Middle Eastern peanut/spice condiment, you will love that. Check back here as I have a post going up on it this week. Thanks for the kind words :)

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